Chloë Hits the Water

Chloe Attends Concert in Park-001

Concert on Oneida Lake

I hadn’t even caught up on recounting my adventures on the trip east when we started our way back. There’s just so much ground to cover! So for now I’ll move on to detailing what a fun time I had in Syracuse while we were there.

We stayed in a different house than we did last year, and I liked this one much better, even though it wasn’t across the street from my aunts Susie and Debby. This house had more rugs for lounging and rubbing my back, and four floors for roaming, including a basement and an attic. I wasn’t supposed to go into the basement, but nobody said anything about the attic, so I snooped around up there a lot, even though it was really, really hot. In fact, it was hot everywhere in this house except in the room we all slept in, where it was always a perfect 68 un-humid degrees. We spent a lot of time in that room. Everywhere else in the house was hot and sticky, and Mike and Heather complained about it a lot more than I did.

Manley Water Tower with Heather and Chloe-001

Manley water towers

Even though it was hot and humid, we took many walks in some neat places, although we often went in the morning, when it was a bit cooler. Meadowbrook Basin and Oakwood Cemetery, with their shady trails and steadily increasing squirrel and deer populations, were still my favorites. We only went to the quarry up at Skytop once this year, but we did get to Clark Reservation, where the cliffs are even taller. I climbed all the way to the top of Pulpit Rock that day, and on another day we hiked up to the water towers above Manley Field House, which are now brightly decorated with spray-paint graffiti.

Chloe at Clark Reservation

Pulpit Rock, Clark Reservation State Park

We also hiked along canals, on former rail beds and around lakes, and threw the ball in the fields behind the high school that was a few blocks away from where we were staying. I got to know the neighborhood well, both from observation and from Mike and Heather recalling instances from when they lived there 20 years ago, long before my time.

More importantly, I finally took part in some water activities besides taking a bath (ugh) and diverting rivers by digging their banks (great fun!). Normally, any slight movement in a body of water, such as a lake lapping gently on its shoreline, sends me into a tizzy. But no one had ever taken me on a boat before, and once I got on top of the water instead of next to it, I had a great time.

Brantingham Lake Chloe on Deck

All paws on deck

First I rode on my buddy David’s power boat on Tuscarora Lake when he took people water skiing. I just walked around on the deck of the boat, watching, and nobody suggested I try anything fancy, like dropping a ski or doing flips. I was good with that. And the following weekend I got a ride around the perimeter of Brantingham Lake in the Adirondacks with my pal Juneau George on a party barge. I didn’t see a lot of partying happening on the boat, but it moved so slowly that I was able to put “all paws on deck” and peer over the railing to spy on the partying on shore.

We also visited the Hansens, whose house we stayed in, while they were living in their farmhouse in Madison County. That was definitely the best spot for me. Not only did it have great scents to track and a giant lawn for fetching my ball, but it had a large pond where I could step right in from shore with no waves in sight. This is exactly the kind of water feature we need in our back yard in Seattle. I’m going to start lobbying for that as soon as I get home.

Chloe at Hansen Farm Swimming

Diving for treats in pond

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Chloë Overcomes a Few of Her Fears

Chloe Sleeps In

Chloë sleeps in before a big day.

This summer’s trip was a little different. I got a lot more ice cream, for starters, and more Frozen PBBs in the car, delivered personally by Mike in little plastic cups usually reserved for white wine at parties. But even beyond the cut on my nose, this trip has also been fraught with potential mental trauma that I had to confront and conquer. It was a journey of growth and change.

  • Normally, I am wary of people I don’t know. Yet on two occasions, both days on the road when it was too hot for me to stay in the car, Mike and Heather went off to museums or someplace else I couldn’t go, and I walked off with complete strangers who Mike met surfing the Internet (actually, on Rover.com–ed.). Both times, when I might have walked off whimpering and flush with anxiety, I trotted off happily and returned the same way a few hours later. Well, the second time was a bit harder, since the sitter person had a little dog of her own who gave me bad vibes at first. But when the sitter sensed I was nervous, we cuddled, and then she took me on a walk to a dog park that was great, because I was the only dog there! If Mike and Heather ever have to leave me with a sitter on the way home, I’m sure I can handle it.
  • Logan and Chloe, Washington, DC

    Logan shared patio and toys.

    Normally, I look the other way when I see another dog. On this trip, I’ve been trying to be friendlier, at least giving dogs a sniff and a few meek wags before ignoring them. I had little choice, really. Not only am I meeting dogs in hotels, on trails, in parks and in elevators, but I’ve had to visit the homes of several: Pippa in Alexandria, Logan in Washington, D.C., Myles and Nelu in Tully, Abby in Mexico (New York, that is) and Cleo in Innisfil, Ontario. There were probably a couple more that I’ve omitted (dogs, write in and I’ll correct my slight!). I got along well with all of them, and also got to play with their toys. Logan had the best collection, by far.

  • Chloe and a Kid in Rocky Mountain National Park

    Put a treat in that hand, kid.

    Normally, when I see a kid coming, I run the other way or hide behind Heather’s legs and hope he or she goes away. On this trip, I wasn’t exactly giving them kisses, but I did let a few invade my space and place a finger or two on my body. Baby steps.

Heck, I even survived an intense lightning and thunder storm while stranded alone in the house Mike and Heather rented. Boy, was I brave that night, if I do have to say so myself. I have to admit, however, that I gave Mike an extra enthusiastic welcome when he finally walked through the front door. I’m still a work in progress.

 

Chloë Finds the First Cut Is the Deepest

Tony Grove Lake Northern Utah-001

Tony Grove Lake, northern Utah, near site where Chloë’s facial laceration occurred.

When it came to getting ready for a cross-country trip, things went a lot smoother the second time around. Heather increased the storage space beneath my bed, and they knew from last year’s photographs exactly how to pack the rear section most efficiently. As soon as we rolled out of Seattle, everyone settled easily into her or his appointed roles: Heather the Driver, Mike the Navigator, Chloë the Queen.

From my backseat throne I could see everything, coming and going. Only on the straightaway interstates did I let myself doze off. All local streets, scenic drives and curvy roads demanded my constant attention. I quickly discovered that by whining whenever I wanted something, I could mandate the pace of our daily progress and dictate the behavior of Driver and Navigator alike. When they started to reach back to poke me for whining, I learned to flee to the far corner behind the driver’s seat as soon as the Navigator looked back at me, knowing he would have to undo his seat belt, get up from his perfectly positioned back cushion, rise and turn his whole body around in order to make contact with me. Not worth his effort, so I win again. And whine again.

Chloe Crawling into Front Seat

My throne is nice, but I really should be in the front seat.

We took a different route this time, further south than last year, which meant more hot weather. Too hot. In Utah it was 102 degrees, and there wasn’t a lot of shade, either. Nice breeze, though! In Washington, D.C., and Syracuse, the temperature hit the high 90s, but it felt like 200 because of the stifling humidity. Sometimes we took our long walk of the day in the morning, trying to beat the heat. Through it all, I soldiered on. “She’s a trooper,” Heather said often. Good thing Mike brought along plenty of beef jerky and made Frozen PBBs on the road this time, because I was deserving of lots of treats.

Were my sterling behavior not enough for praise, I won additional points by remaining calm after cutting the side of my face in a sniffing incident near Bear Lake in northeastern Utah. Whatever the source of the laceration, it was rapidly discovered because of the blood dripping from my snout onto the sidewalk amidst the interpretive signage. Nurse Heather did an excellent job under fire by stopping the bleeding and applying antibiotic ointment on the wound. A scab formed quickly that I proudly wore all the way to Syracuse. You can see it to the right of my nose in the photo above. Thankfully, it just fell off by itself one night before I started to pick at it. I’ll no doubt have a scar on my snout, but the hair is already growing back and should mostly cover it. My pristine countenance will continue unmarred.

Chloe on Chair

Morning nap in hotel chair.

There were other traumatic experiences on the trip, but I’ll save some tales for another day. On the plus side, I enjoyed improved accommodations throughout the trip, mostly thanks to my pal Charlie cluing in Mike that LaQuinta Inns are dog-friendly with no fee. Mike liked that part a lot. I still slept in my travel crate every night, but in the morning Heather was a little more lenient about my napping arrangements than she had been last year.We’ll see how it goes on the way back.

 

 

Chloë Enters the Condo Market

4-Discovery Park Historic District 9

Officers’ Row

With more mulching and planting around my trail and more water lines along side it, we have feared potential development on Chloe’s Lane for some time. But with all of the houses on Officers’ Row in the park behind it sold for millions, a more affordable alternative has sprouted right at the elbow of my favorite fetch route.

3-Chloe's Lane Condo with Chloe-001

Hut 1, Hut 2

 

Neither Mike, Heather nor my good pal Charlie had a clear explanation of what it was exactly, or who was responsible for it. Whether the work of kids, illegal campers or beer-drinking teens, we’ll probably never know. All I know for certain is that the thing is in my way, and I want it gone by the time I come back from vacation.

 

 

 

Chloë Mentors Merrie

Merrie

I know it’s hard to envision me as a role model for anyone. I see myself more as a Charles Barkley, don’t-call-me-a-role-model type. But Merrie, the Basset hound who lives down my street, really needs my help if she is ever going to mature into a well-behaved, well-rounded dog. When they put it that way, I just couldn’t say no. So Heather and I and Merrie and her owner Jane all went to the park one morning for our first lesson. We ran around, and they did a lot of talking. I thought it went well, but I could see there’s a lot of work left to do.

Learning a thing or two.

Merrie wants to romp around and play with other dogs, but she doesn’t understand how to do it. When she was young, she never got socialized with other pups like I did in my puppy kindergarten.  Now, as an adult, Merrie is big, but she doesn’t know her own strength. Dealing with her girth is fine when she and I are just running around on the parade ground, but when she wants to pounce and sit on me, that’s not OK, and I had to let her know it.. I could have nipped at her and bared my teeth, but I figured if I just rolled over on my back and showed her my belly, she would get that same message in a gentler way. It worked, too.

Ready for action

Moving forward, if I can just get Merrie to reign in her enthusiasm a little, we’ll be good together as frolickers for years to come. Heather and I plan to resume her lessons as soon as we return from summer vacation. We all have too many things to do before we leave to make any real progress at this point. Baby steps.

Chloë Matriculates

Practice makes perfect.

Shortly before the spring quarter classes ended, Mike, Heather and I  had the chance to walk around campus at the University of Washington, and I managed to soak up enough atmosphere to earn my advanced degree in fetchology.

Here’s an excerpt of my thesis presentation.

 

I was proud to do so well in quickly adapting to a new campus setting. All those Huskies on campus have nothing on me. They bowed down to me and the orange Syracuse collar I wear around my neck. I bow to no one.

Chloë Has a Crowning Achievement

I realize I have been laggard in reporting on the second phase of my oral surgery, but the news was good. My personal dentist, Dr. Evan Crocker, did a masterful job when installing a shiny new titanium crown over the chipped tooth that resulted in last month’s root canal procedure. Check it out here in these photos, graciously provided by the Mercer Island Vetinerary Clinic, as I am unlikely to slow down enough to show it to you myself. You have to fold back my upper lip pretty far to get a good view.

My new crown on the top row.

A close-up view. What a shine!

Unfortunately, Dr. Crocker also discovered a little growth on the gum line beneath the crown that he missed the last time, so he cut it out and sent it out for biopsy, just to make sure it’s benign. We await the results, but nobody seems too worried about it. Besides, if I have to go back to Mercer Island before my six-month checkup, I’ll get to see all my new good buddies there, including Justin, the nice guy with shiny blue nail polish that goes well with my shiny new crown.